Lindsay Hunter

Lindsay Hunter is a writer living in Chicago. She is the co-founder and co-host of the Quickies! reading series. Her work has previously been published in McSweeney’s Internet Tendency and Nerve, and is forthcoming in Featherproof as well as Make Magazine.

Sam Reaves

Sam Reaves has written seven Chicago-based crime novels, including the Cooper MacLeish series, the Dooley series and the forthcoming stand-alone Mean Town Blues. Under the pen name Dominic Martell he has authored a European-based suspense trilogy. Reaves has traveled widely in Europe and the Middle East but has lived in the Chicago area most of his life. He has worked as a teacher and a translator. More about Sam Reaves at http://www.samreaves.com/.

Mamoud Saeed

Mahmoud Saeed is a prominent and award-winning Iraqi novelist. He has written more than 20 novels and short story collections, including Port Said and Other Stories, which was published in 1957. The first military-Baathist Iraqi government seized two of his novels in 1963. Saeed was imprisoned several times and he left Iraq in 1985 after the authorities banned the publication of some of his novels, including Zanka bin Baraka (1970), which nevertheless won the Ministry of Information Award in 1993. His new novel The World in Angel’s Eyes will be published in Cairo, Egypt. You can read more about Mahmoud Saeed at http://www.arabworldbooks.com/authors/mahmoud_saeed.html

Chicago | April 27, 2008

You won’t want to miss the literary talent in Chi-town this Sunday! The powerhouse lineup includes a renowned Iraqi novelist, a veteran crime writer, and the co-founder of the Quickies! reading series.

Mahmoud SaeedMahmoud Saeed is a prominent and award-winning Iraqi novelist. He has written more than 20 novels and short story collections, including Port Said and Other Stories, which was published in 1957. The first military-Baathist Iraqi government seized two of his novels in 1963. Saeed was imprisoned several times and he left Iraq in 1985 after the authorities banned the publication of some of his novels, including Zanka bin …

Poets & Poetry in Sunday Salon!

The literary gods sent four talented writers and poets to grace the stage and the audience at April’s Sunday Salon! Relishing the prose of Paul Pines, Janice Erlbaum, Myla Jones, and Ed Pavlic, were celebrated poets, Yusuf Komunyakaa and Major Jackson.

Yes, your Salon hostesses were soaking in all the stellar prose and poetry vibes that night and are still floating somewhere between heaven and earth. Missed it? Well then, have a look at the photos: http://www.sundaysalon.com/pics/

And to share the love, we’re welcoming poetry to the SalonZine. That’s right: long live prose and poetry on-line! Our inaugural issue poets include the veritable KC Trommer and …

S.G. Frazier

S.G. Frazier is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. He holds a BFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. His work has appeared in American Poet, Ontario Review, and various literary journals.

KC Trommer

KC Trommer’s poems have appeared in or are forthcoming from AGNI, The Antioch Review, Octopus, MARGIE and the crime poetry collection The Lineup. A 2007 graduate of the MFA program at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, KC has been the recipient of an Academy of American Poets prize, as well as fellowships from the Maine Summer Arts Program, the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Prague Summer Program. She lives in New York with the novelist Justin Courter.

The Hello Girls

BY KC TROMMER

Good morning. Operator.
A few hundred calls an hour. Inferno.
Red lights: incoming white lights: connected
damn thing ablaze at all hours.

9 p.m. to 2 a.m. for the new girls, stuffing cords into
machine mouths:
Schenectady 793,
Saratoga 518,
up to the Stony Creek corner payphone.
1957: there is a script. Not Yes but Surely
to the man calling Detroit collect.
The voice was to sparkle. The smile comes through.
One ring, the metal click and
slide of ten girls plugging in.

10:15 and 3:15
could never come fast enough and
if she blinked–Hold, please–
she might miss a break, pull the plug on a man
who called her sweetheart.

Firecracker

BY S.G. FRAZIER

A row of glistening kids stood under the pool lamp, gazing through the fence links as one of the witnesses, beer coolie in hand flyswatter in the other, reported to the cops that guilty boys had scattered.

I saw them, belly first, feet slapping the sidewalk running through the breezeway. And when the cops, in their shiny tactical boots, knocked at my apartment, asking what I saw, I told them the kid’s name was Paul that he was dribbling down the breezeway when the M-80 went off in his face, that earlier in the day, over by the dumpster, the same boys were stuffing Ladyfingers in a calico’s …

Neema Ngwatilo Mawiyoo

Neema Ngwatilo Mawiyoo grew up singing in church in Nairobi, Kenya, but it was while at university that Ngwatilo’s relationship with music took a definitive turn. She embarked on a quest for self that took her to Johannesburg, South Africa to study the role of Kwaito music in shaping post-apartheid urban youth identity. There Ngwatilo found the stuff of poems spewing out of impassioned exchanges with friends, thick in the air at a particular Jozi reading, and alone with her on the road between Venda and Johannesburg. There was little to do but hold on.( http://www.myspace.com/ngwatilo )

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