NYC | March 19, 2017

The season of illumination is fast approaching! On March 19th, Sunday Salon welcomes to the stage six remarkably talented and powerful poets and writers of color for the Eighth Annual BREAD LOAF WRITERS FROM THE DARK TOWER Reading. You won’t want to miss this special event! At Jimmys no. 43. 7pm.

Shauna Barbosa’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The Awl, Colorado ReviewVirginia Quarterly Review, RHINO PoetryThe Atlas Review, No Tokens Journal, PANK and others. She received her MFA from Bennington College. Her first book, Cape Verdean Blues is forthcoming in 2018 from Pitt Poetry Series.

Maya Doig-Acuña is from Brooklyn, New York. She is a recent graduate of Middlebury College, where she majored in American Studies and wrote a senior thesis about the incomparable Junot Diaz. While in college, she worked as a founding editor for a student-run blog, “Beyond the Green,” a platform for marginalized voices. She has been published on Medium, Between the Cracks Magazine, and several Middlebury College publications. She enjoys writing memoir and fiction, and sometimes poetry if she knows no one else will read it.

Duarte Geraldino is a national TV journalist and novelist. His work has been distributed through most major news networks. He is currently contributing reports to the PBS NewsHour and revising his first novel, from which he will read tonight.  He has attended the Bread Loaf Writers Conference and Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation (VONA) conference for writers of color.

Ananda Lima holds an MA in Linguistics from UCLA. She was a mentee in the AWP Writer to Writer Program and has attended workshops at Sewanee and Tin House, as well as Bread Loaf. She has taught at UCLA and The Montclair State University. Her work has appeared in The American Poetry Review. Ananda is currently working on a collection of poems on identity in motherhood and immigration, and a novel set in Brasilia, where she grew up as the daughter of migrants from Northeast Brazil. Find her at anandalima.com.

Airea D. Matthews’s first collection of poems, Simulacra, received the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Award (Yale University Press, 2017). Her work has appeared in Best American Poets 2015American Poet, Four Way Review, The Indiana Review, and Michigan Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. She received the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and was awarded the Louis Untermeyer Scholarship in Poetry from the 2016 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She received her B.A. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania, her M.P.A. from the University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy, and her M.F.A. from the University of Michigan Helen Zell Writers’ Program. Ms. Matthews is working on her second poetry collection, under/class, which explores the behavioral and cultural ramifications of poverty. She lives in Detroit, Michigan, with her husband and four children.

Koye Oyedeji’s writing has appeared in a number of periodicals including Wasafiri Magazine (UK), BRAND Magazine (University of Greenwich, UK) and the Washington City Paper Fiction Issue. He has also contributed to collections such as IC3: The Penguin Book of Black British Writing (Penguin) and the anthology Closure (Peepal Tree). He has attended the Callaloo and VONA writing workshops and was recently a Tennessee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writer’s Conference. He is currently at work on a collection of short stories and a novel.

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SPECIAL THANKS to Ru Freeman for curating this annual reading for the past eight years! This special event features talented writers of color, who’ve all had the honor of connecting and cultivating their work at past Bread Loaf Writers’ Conferences. 

Ru Freeman is the author of the novels A Disobedient Girl (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2009) and On Sal Mal Lane (Graywolf, 2013), a New York Times Editor’s Choice Book. She is the editor of the ground-breaking anthology, Extraordinary Rendition: American Writers on Palestine (2015). Ru is the 2014 winner of the Sister Mariella Gable Award for Fiction, and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for Fiction by an American Woman.

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